Health Insurance

Health insurance premiums through marketplace poised to jump in 2023

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If you get your health insurance through the government Health Insurance Marketplace, you may want to brace for higher premiums next year.

Unless Congress takes action, enhanced premium subsidies — technically, tax credits — that have been in place for 2021 and 2022 will disappear after this year. The change would affect 13 million of the 14.5 million people who get their health insurance through the federal exchange or their state’s marketplace.

“The default is that the expanded subsidies will expire at the end of this year,” said Cynthia Cox, a vice president at the Kaiser Family Foundation and director of its Affordable Care Act program. “On average, premiums would go up more than 50%, but for some it will be more.”

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New Study: Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance Produces +47% Return on Investment for American Businesses

Washington, D.C. — Employers in the United States this year will earn an average return on investment (ROI) of 47% from their employer-sponsored health insurance (ESI) programs, according to a new study from Avalere Health. This means for every dollar spent on ESI, employers get back $1.47 in financial benefits. The analysis from the health data firm finds that the average ROI is projected to grow to 52% in 2026, and that businesses that invest more in their ESI programs tend have a higher ROI. 

While providing employees high quality health insurance is the right thing to do for workers, the report shows how it makes business sense. Avalere attributes the direct financial return for employers to lower direct medical costs, increased productivity, lower recruitment costs, stronger retention, lower short- and long-term disability costs, as well as tax benefits. More than 155 million Americans currently get their health insurance

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They Thought They Were Buying Obamacare Plans. What They Got Wasn’t Insurance.

[UPDATED on June 8]

Tina Passione needed health insurance in a hurry in December. The newly retired 63-year-old was relocating to suburban Atlanta with her husband to be closer to grandchildren. Their house in Pittsburgh flew off the market, and they had six weeks to move out 40 years of memories.

Passione said she went online to search for the federal health insurance marketplace, clicked on a link, and entered her information. She promptly got multiple calls from insurance brokers and bought a plan for $384 a month. Later, though, when she went to a pharmacy and doctor offices in Georgia, she was told she did not have insurance.

In fact, it said it right on her card: “THIS IS NOT INSURANCE.”

Passione is one of 10 consumers who told KHN that they thought they were buying insurance but learned later that they had been sold a membership to a

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Health insurers to pay $1 billion in rebates to 8.2 million people this year

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There’s a chance your health insurance company owes you some cash.

Depending on how you get your coverage, you may be one of the 8.2 million policyholders expected to get a piece of $1 billion in premium rebates this fall from various insurers, according to a preliminary analysis from the Kaiser Family Foundation.

The amount is down from $2 billion issued in 2021 and a record $2.5 billion in 2020.

“In the last couple of years we’ve seen some really large rebates — twice the size of this year’s amount,” said Cynthia Cox, a vice president at the foundation and director of its Affordable Care Act program. “But I’d say $1 billion is still significant.”

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Possible Expiration of Pandemic-Era Measures Among Drivers of 2023 Health Insurance Premium Changes

WASHINGTON, June 22, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — The American Academy of Actuaries has released a public policy issue brief that points to the possible expiration of two signature pandemic-era measures that boosted health insurance affordability and coverage as among the drivers of potential premium changes for individual and small group plans in 2023.

American Academy of Actuaries. (PRNewsFoto/American Academy of Actuaries)

“Proposed health insurance premium rates reflect many factors, which can include the effects of legislative and regulatory changes,” said Academy Senior Health Fellow Cori Uccello. “This is especially true for 2023 rates, due to the possible expiration later this year of enhanced Affordable Care Act (ACA) premium subsidies and of a key support of Medicaid coverage during the pandemic.”

The issue brief, developed by the Academy’s Individual and Small Group Markets Committee, Drivers of 2023 Health Insurance Premium Changes, discusses these key factors and others that may account

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Republican states trying to ban abortion expand health benefits for new mothers | Abortion

A number of Republican-led states that are moving to ban abortion are, at the same time, extending health insurance benefits to new mothers, professing to support “women in crisis”.

As the US supreme court prepares to rule on national abortion rights, many Republican states are seeking severe abortion bans that would force many women to carry pregnancies to term, likely worsening the US maternal mortality crisis.

Some of those same lawmakers are now passing bills that extend Medicaid benefits to low-income mothers, typically for one year after they give birth rather than the current two months.

Arizona, Florida, Tennessee and Texas have all extended health benefits for low-income mothers in recent months, and Alabama and Georgia have both moved to implement such extensions, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation. All have also sought to impose severe abortion restrictions or bans.

Although expanding pregnancy-related health coverage is “a win

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Links: Mark Shields’ death; universal health insurance; free speech

Political columnist Mark Shields died last week. There have been many tributes, all of which focused not only on his sharp commentary but also on what a decent person he was, and the fact that he was interested in, not appalled by, encounters with people who saw the world through different lenses from the ones he used. That is to say, he was an intellectual liberal as well as a political one. Two years ago, when he retired, his sparring partner on PBS’s “NewsHour,” David Brooks, wrote a lovely encomium.

There is nothing liberal about billionaire libertarian Peter Thiel, whom The Washington Post’s Elizabeth Dwoskin profiled in Sunday’s June 19 paper. I knew some but not all of this, and was especially intrigued by the title of a biography of Thiel: The Contrarian. Huh? There is nothing contrarian about this ideologue. That is what is so frightening about

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Millions could lose health coverage if premium subsidies expire later this year, officials say

Absent Congressional action, many consumers will see health-coverage costs skyrocket next year, Biden administration officials warned Wednesday. 

The American Rescue Plan, signed into law in March 2021, temporarily expanded premium tax credits available to consumers signing up for health coverage through the Affordable Care Act marketplaces. Those expanded tax credits are set to expire at the end of this year, and extending them would require Congressional legislation. 

“Time is of the essence,” Chiquita Brooks-LaSure, administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, said on a call with reporters Wednesday. As this fall’s open enrollment for 2023 marketplace coverage draws near, “we want to make sure that people know the subsidies will be in place,” she said. 

A record 14.5 million people signed up for coverage through the marketplaces during the open enrollment period that ended in January. The average monthly 2022 premium for HealthCare.gov enrollees was $111. Without the

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